NPAP

Curriculum

 

 

This Curriculum is for all Members-in-Training. Course are listed by level.


Enrollment Level: Required Courses


R600A: Essential Concepts of Freud
R600B: Development of Psychoanalytic Thought
R Freud I: Freud Seminar I
R Freud II: Freud Seminar II
R603: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development I
R604: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development II
R605: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis I
R606: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis II
R607: Analysis Of Resistance
R609: Introduction to Dream Interpretation
R610: Psychopharmacology and Psychoanalysis (6 sessions)
R660A: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)
R660B: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)
R665: Professional Ethics in Psychoanalytic Practice
IPT: Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique

Candidates are required to take the following practicums, in sequence, after passing the Readiness for Clinical Practice evaluation or after passing Matriculation.

RPT1: Psychoanalytic Technique I
RPT2: Psychoanalytic Technique II

Case Presentation by Guest Analyst must be taken twice at the Enrollment level as R660A and R660B. It must be taken again at the Matriculation level as R760 or at the Readiness-for-Control level as R860 for a total of three times.
 


Matriculation Level: Required Courses


R703: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications Of Ego Psychology/Structural Theory
R704: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Object Relations
R705: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Self Psychology/Intersubjective Theory
R706: Psychoanalytic Theory, Diagnosis and Treatment of Borderline Pathology
R708: Analysis of Transference and Countertransference
R710: Psychoanalytic Research Methodology
R718: Sociocultural Influence on Development and Psychopathology
RPT3: Psychoanalytic Technique III
RPT4: Psychoanalytic Technique IV
RPT5: Psychoanalytic Technique V
R760: Case Presentation by Guest Analyst (6 sessions)
R Freud III: The Different Patient

Before completing the Matriculation level, all candidates who are seeking the License in Psychoanalysis must complete at least 2 clock hours of training in the identification and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment. NPAP will provide this training.

At this juncture candidates preparing for the application for the License in Psychoanalysis have completed the coursework requirement for the Certificate of Completion.

 

Readiness for Control Level: Required Courses


In addition to the 8 required courses, the requirement to complete 4 elective courses, if not taken previously, must be completed at this level. Electives taken during any Winter Intersession at any level of training are counted towar the elective requirements.

R801: Case Presentation by Student Analysts I
R802: Case Presentation by Student Analysts II
R803: Relational Psychoanalysis
R807: Continuous Case Seminar
R809: Advanced Dream Analysis
R860: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)
R Freud IV: The Enduring Contributions of Sigmund Freud



Electives


The list of Elective courses is not static. Courses that offer new analytic perspectives are added as they are approved. Each year a different range of electives is offered to the candidates.

E805: Gender Development: Psychoanalytic Theory of Male and Female Development
E809: Psychoanalytic Theory of Psychosis
E810: Seminar on Freud’s Famous Clinical Cases
E813: Seminar on Masochism
E814: Contemporary Development in Kleinian Theory and Technique
E816: Narcissism
E817: Advanced Seminar on Character Analysis and Treatment of the Character Disorders
E820: Current Literature on Psychoanalytic Technique
E825: Seminar on Symbolization and Creativity
E827: Independent Study of Psychoanalysis
E831: The Psychoanalytic Approach to Psychosomatic Pathology
E832: Inductions, Seductions:  Through a Dark Mirror
E833: Seminar on Depression
E850: Fantasy and Unconscious Process
E864: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis

The following courses will cover a variety of contributions from different theoretical perspectives:
E864C: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis: Introduction to Bion
E864D: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis:  Introduction to Lacan

E866: Lesbians in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice
E867: The Homosexual Male in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice
E868: Seminar on Attachment Theory
E872: Writing Psychoanalysis
E882: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory of Trauma & Dissociation

Winter Intercession Electives: NPAP offers two 12-session semesters—Fall and Spring—with occasional summer offerings. The Fall semester runs from September to December; the Spring semester run from March through May. If summer courses are offered, they begin in June. The Winter Intercession, in January and February, offers candidates 6-session courses dealing with contemporary issues in psychoanalysis. Each of these courses counts as one-half of an elective. Winter electives enable candidates to fulfill elective requirements. Some of these courses are open to candidates at all levels of training. For candidates at any level of training, each course completed during the Winter Intersession will be counted toward their elective requirements.
 


Course Descriptions


R600A: Essential Concepts of Freud
This course is an overview of Freud's thinking from 1895 to 1926.  It will serve as a context for the later modules that will go into the various aspects of Freud's meta-psychology in depth.  Readings will include selections from Studies in Hysteria and The Interpretation of Dreams.  Freud's Technique Papers (1904, 1913, 1914) will introduce students to notions of resistance, defense, working through, and transference-countertransference.  The second half of the course will focus on Beyond the Pleasure Principle-the revision of drive theory to include the death instinct; The Ego and the Id, which introduced the structural model of the mind; and Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety, the revision of Freud's theory of anxiety.
Prerequisite: Enrollment.

R600B: Development of Psychoanalytic Thought
The Seminar is an introduction to theoretical developments and changes in the analytic world, starting with and related to, Freud's original and massive contributions. Following a brief overview of Freud's early theories of the mind the Seminar reviews the diversity and integration of later analytic theorists who add to Freud's work, leading to a contemporary Freudian perspective on analytic theory and technique. The theorists touched on include the contributions of Ferenczi, the Ego Psychologists (Anna Freud and Heinz Hartmann), Melanie Klein, Harry Stack Sullivan, Kohut, the British theorists  (Fairbairn, Winnicott and Balint), and the work of Hans Loewald.  The Seminar also touches on implications for technique related to the later theoretical developments.
Prerequisite: Enrollment, R600A.

R Freud I: Freud Seminar I
This course is a continuation of R600A Essential Concepts of Freud, focusing on his Theory of infantile sexuality, pivotal first thoughts on the puzzles of narcissism (the transition to ego psychology), and Freud’s evolving conception of neurosis and its treatment.
Prerequisite: Enrollment, R600A. (This course, together with R Freud II, is the equivalent of the former R601.)

R Freud II: Freud Seminar II
To be determined.
Prerequisite: Enrollment, R600A. (This course, together with R Freud I, is the equivalent of the former R601.)

R Freud III: The Different Patient
Freud's original understanding of the aetiology of hysteria, known as "the seduction theory," is congruent with modern sensitivity to the large number of patients who have experienced sexual, sadistic and/or psychological trauma.  Unlike patients who need help working through resistance, traumatized patients are different in that they need someone to bear witness in words to what happened, rather than a therapist who mistakenly reenacts the veil of silence.  This module emphasizes a distinctive treatment approach to trauma and revives Ferenczi's quest for the maternal style.
Prerequisite: Matriculation. (This course, together with R Freud IV, is the equivalent of the former R702.)

R Freud IV: The Enduring Contributions of Sigmund Freud
Although advances in the neurosciences have invalidated some of Freud’s hypotheses, a number of his contributions still continue to remain the foundation of contemporary psychoanalysis as a valid body of knowledge and therapeutic discipline.  This course will highlight these contributions: the development of the analytic observational method; the discovery that human mentation is largely unconscious, including the conceptualization of a system of unconscious defensive operations; the insight that human behavior is characterized by a variety of automatic repetitions; the discovery of the role of early childhood vicissitudes in personality development and pathogenesis; and the universally important discovery of two distinct modes of thought processing, the primary and secondary process.  Other important though less developed ideas introduced by Freud that have been later more elaborated on and better understood, such as his clinical insights and initial thoughts on narcissism, trauma, and working through, will also be discussed.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control. (This course, together with R Freud III, is the equivalent of the former R702.)

R603: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development I
An exploration of normal and pathological development from infancy through the pre-Oedipal and Oedipal periods, The central tasks and conflicts of Freudian Theory, Object Relations, and Self-Psychology will be presented, as well as recent contributions from Attachment Theory and Infant Observation.
Prerequisite: Enrollment.

R604: Psychoanalytic Theory of Human Development II
The discussion of  normal and pathological development in latency, pre-adolescence, adolescence and adulthood.
Prerequisite: Enrollment and R603.

R605: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis I
The psychoanalytic theory of anxiety states, hysterias, obsessions, and depression will be examined. The course introduces the mechanisms and features of symptom formation and character development. The course also discusses the determination of psychic structures by ego and superego functioning, the drive-defense conflict model, the structural deficit model, and the adaptational model. Diagnostic considerations are conceptualized and are used to understand the implications of patients' material and enactments, particularly in regard to the timing and formulation of interventions.
Prerequisite: Enrollment. Sequence Recommendation: R600A, R603, R604.

R606: Psychoanalytic Diagnosis II
Diagnosis II emphasizes the continuities and differences in psychic structure for character disorders, perversions, and narcissistic, borderline, and psychotic organizations. As in R605, diagnostic considerations are conceptualized and are used to understand the implications of patients’ material and enactments, particularly in regard to the timing and formulation of interventions.
Prerequisite: Enrollment. Sequence Recommendation: R600A, R603, R604, R605.

R607: Analysis Of Resistance
The resistance seminar studies Freud's contributions to the analysis of resistance; the role of psychic structures; character; multiple theories of resistance including object relations, self psychology and ego psychology; manifestations of resistances and methods of working therapeutically with resistances.
Candidate presentations are integrated with readings.
Prerequisite: Open to Candidates who have had a minimum of one year of experience working with patients.

R609: Introduction to Dream Interpretation
An intensive study of Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams.  Using this book and updating it where appropriate, this course will focus on techniques of dream interpretation and on the topographic theory of dream construction as conceptualized in the text.
Prerequisite: Enrollment.

R610: Psychopharmacology and Psychoanalysis (6 sessions)
Many psychoanalytic patients require and are using psychoactive medication for relief of symptoms and to enhance their talk therapy. This course deals with the unconscious psychodynamics involved in medication use, including resistance, compliance, transference, countertransference, and the meaning of transitional phenomena.  Socio-cultural factors will also be reviewed. Students learn how to clarify the diagnosis based on DMS criteria and how to collaborate with the psychiatrist.  Medications targeting various symptoms will be discussed for different age groups.
Prerequisite:  Open to candidates who see patients (This course is the equivalent to the former R815.)

R660A: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)
R660B: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)

Candidates are offered an opportunity to hear analysts present cases and participate in collegial discussions. The Guest Analysts course also provides a model for future Case Presentation. The course must be taken again at the Matriculation level (R760) or at the Readiness-for-Control level (R860).  Tuition is charged for each series.

R665: Professional Ethics in Psychoanalytic Practice

The ethics course addresses the dilemmas commonly encountered in clinical practice concerning boundaries and boundary violations, confidentiality, competence, illness, exploitation, relationship with colleagues, and other related topics. Discussions will be based on material brought in by the participants and on the American Psychoanalytic Association Ethics Case Book, a compilation of fictitious cases illustrating the many ethical dilemmas confronting clinicians.
Prerequisite: Enrollment.

IPT: Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique
This course deals with engaging the patient in the analytic treatment and putting into process the structures of treatment. It starts from the point of entering treatment, the initial interview, establishing a therapeutic alliance and frame and understanding the nature of the patient's and therapist's conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings.
Prerequisite: Enrollment. (This course is the equivalent of the former PP1 or PP2.)

RPT1: Psychoanalytic Technique I
This course focuses on the use of psychoanalytic concepts in clinical work and is based on candidates’ cases. Listening analytically, understanding unconscious communications and engaging patients in the treatment process are some of the areas addressed.  Candidates should have patients to discuss.
Prerequisite: Passing of either RCP or Matriculation evaluations. (This course is the equivalent of the former CP1.)

RPT2: Psychoanalytic Technique II
This course covers the practical and technical aspects of psychoanalytic treatment, from various theoretical perspectives, as candidates continue to develop their professional analytic selves. Class participants introduce issues and problems from their own clinical experiences, and discuss weekly required readings as they relate to such topics as: beginning treatment, treatment dynamics, conscious and unconscious processes, transference and countertransference dynamics and basic management issues.
Prerequisite: RPT1. (This course is the equivalent of the former CP2.)

R703: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications Of Ego Psychology/Structural Theory
This course begins with the historical perspective of the four phases of Ego Psychology and Structural Theory, studying the works of Hartmann, Spitz, Anna Freud and others. It then proceeds to the evolved contemporary mainstream work of Gray, Busch, et al. “Ego Psychology” is a psychoanalytic developmental object relations theory that now encompasses aspects of drive and structure, as well as internalized object relations, and it’s implications for therapeutic action.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

R704: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Object Relations
Introduction to the British Object Relations theorists, including the works of Fairbairn, Balint, Guntrip, and Winnicott. The object relations model is distinguished from the classical intrapsychic model through clinical case material illustrating interpretations drawn from both theoretical models.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

R705: Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment Implications of Self Psychology/Intersubjective Theory
Reviews the evolution of Self Psychology within psychoanalysis, developing basic concepts such as self-object transferences, empathic introspective mode of listening and a redefinition of narcissism. The course will explore contemporary developments in self psychology and examine where the theory fits into the relational perspective of psychoanalysis.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

R706: Psychoanalytic Theory, Diagnosis and Treatment of Borderline Pathology
A study of the aetiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment of the borderline patient. Characteristic defenses, such as slitting and projective identification are discussed in relation to the unique transferences, resistances and countertransferences associated with borderline conditions. Readings include the theoretical views of Kernberg, Kohut, Giovacchini, Searles, Fonagy, Bromberg and attachment theorists.
Prerequisite:  Matriculation.

R708: Analysis of Transference and Countertransference
From both historical and differing clinical perspectives, this course explores the contributions that both the analyst and the analysand bring to the transference situation.  Topics such as transference neurosis, therapeutic alliance, varieties of transference and countertransference, the role of cultural factors, and relevant techniques for working with transference will be addressed.  Clinical presentations will be integrated with theoretical considerations.
Prerequisite:  Matriculation.

R710: Psychoanalytic Research Methodology
The research course is designed as an introduction to the literature and methods of empirical psychoanalytic research. The course will focus upon research approaches to issues confronting psychoanalysis both as an approach to understanding mind and as clinical practice.  Psychoanalytic research deals with affirming the validity of the discipline of psychoanalysis and can be divided into four domains: outcome research, process research, developmental psychoanalytic research, and conceptual research.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

R718 Sociocultural Influence on Development and Psychopathology
This course delves into the effects of sociocultural factors derived from ethnicity, nationality, race, class, and gender on configurations of the self, early development, and the salience of certain kinds of psycho-pathology. It further covers treatment issues involving resistance, transference, countertransference, modes of communication, and the structuring of the psychoanalytic relationship as these vary among patients from diverse cultures.
Prerequisite: Matriculation

RPT3: Psychoanalytic Technique III
Case Seminar is intended to provide the clinical experience for RPT4 and PRT5.  Clinical implications of multiple perspectives in psychoanalysis, along with developmental considerations in conceptualizing a therapeutic stance, will be discussed.  The class discussions and assigned readings will be integrated with the candidates' case presentations.
Prerequisite:  RPT1 and RPT2 (unless the candidate was exempted upon enrollment). (This course is the equivalent of the former R712.)

RPT4: Psychoanalytic Technique IV
This course utilizes candidate cases to introduce the structure of the psychoanalytic situation and the beginning phase of treatment. Topics include comparisons between psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, manifestations of transference, transference neurosis and resistance, free association and the use of the couch, the therapeutic alliance and acting-out.
Prerequisite: RPT1 and RPT2 (unless the candidate was exempted upon enrollment) and RPT3. (This course is the equivalent of the former R713.)

RPT5: Psychoanalytic Technique V
This course will address the application of the processes studied in RPT4 to the difficult patient, the borderline and narcissistic individual–and differentiates between the opening, middle, and termination phases of treatment. Multiple theoretical points of view are considered in formulating a therapeutic stance and the varied bases for analytic technique. Concepts such as analyzability, the use of self, and the ability to symbolize are studied, along with their impact on the analytic process sand on countertransference.  Candidate case material is used to illustrate and provide clinical focus for discussion.
Prerequisite: RPT4. (This course is the equivalent of the former R714.)

R760: Case Presentation by Guest Analyst (6 sessions)
See course description for R660A and R660B.

R801: Case Presentation by Student Analysts I
In a workshop format, candidates learn how to conceptualize and to organize a psychoanalytic case. The course explores the creation of a clinical narrative, the candidates role in the narrative, and theoretical conceptualizations of the unfolding narrative. Special emphasis will be placed on how to make the treatment presentation come alive.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

R802: Case Presentation by Student Analysts II
This seminar prepares candidates for final Case Presentation. It focuses on the organization, presentation, and theoretical discussion of ongoing psychoanalytic treatment. Candidates take turns presenting cases. The instructor may assign readings relevant to the application of psychoanalytic theory to the understanding of personality problems and their treatment.  This course should be taken at the end of the curriculum and during the candidate’s second Control Analysis.
Prerequisite: R801.

R803: Relational Psychoanalysis
A comprehensive overview of the Relational School of psychoanalysis will be presented.  Special focus will be given to the works of Stephen Mitchell, Robert Stolorow, Lewis Aron, and Irwin Hoffman.  Topics such as social constructivism, intersubjectivity, and the problem of gender are emphasized.  The broad implications of a relational approach to analytic practice will be examined, particularly the changes in the way analysts think about and work with countertransference. The course concludes with a discussion of future directions in relational thinking.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

R807: Continuous Case Seminar
Case material from an analysand currently in treatment with a seminar member will be presented for ongoing detailed follow-up and discussion.  The patient will be selected on the basis of usefulness for delineating transference-countertransference issues, dynamics, and aspects of technique. The aim is to help candidates integrate theoretical knowledge with clinical understanding in making technical interventions and interpretations. Specific interests of the participants will be addressed along with relevant readings. It is highly recommended that candidates enrolling in R807 understand the need for process recording with their patients, either during or after their sessions, to enable seminar members to follow the patient; and that they be seeing patients in treatment at least three times weekly.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

R809: Advanced Dream Analysis
Advanced Dream Analysis focuses on post-Freudian contributions to the analysis of dreams. Theory and technique are explored from different psychoanalytic perspectives. Topics covered include: contemporary emphasis on the manifest content, the primary process, and the dream context. In addition, self-state dreams, the implications of REM dream research, and initial dreams will be studied. Candidate presentations are integrated with the theoretical readings.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

R815: Psychopharmacology and Psychoanalysis
Many psychoanalytic patients require and are using psychoactive medication for relief of symptoms and to enhance their talk therapy. This course deals with the unconscious psychodynamics involved in medication use, including resistance, compliance, transference, countertransference, and the meaning of transitional phenomena.  Socio-cultural factors will also be reviewed. Students learn how to clarify the diagnosis based on DMS criteria and how to collaborate with the psychiatrist.  Medications targeting various symptoms will be discussed for different age groups.
Prerequisite:  Open to candidates who see patients.

R860: Case Presentation by Guest Analysts (6 sessions)
See course description for R660A and R660B.

Electives


E805: Gender Development: Psychoanalytic Theory of Male and Female Development.
The course reviews traditional theories of male and female development and re-examines these in the light of  gender theory.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E809: Psychoanalytic Theory of Psychosis.
Explores psychotic organization as conceptualized by theorists such as Freud, Federn, Klein, Bion, Winnicott, Elkin, Green, and Grotstein. The relevance of psychotic dynamics for various "disorders of self" (e.g., borderline, narcissistic, schizoid) is discussed. The main focus is on psychotic patterns and psychoanalytic ways of presenting and understanding them. The central question for the course is "What can psychosis tell us about psychoanalysis, and psychoanalysis about psychosis?"
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E810: Seminar on Freud’s Famous Clinical Cases.
From Anna O. to the “Wolf Man,” Freud's great clinical-literary mas-terpieces will be reviewed for their usefulness in understanding the theoretical issues occupying Freud at the time of their composition. The clinical issues of these cases will be discussed for their significance to analytic technique.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E813: Seminar on Masochism.
Readings and clinical material highlight the psychoanalytic under-standing of the development and place of masochism in personality and psychopathology.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E814: Contemporary Development in Kleinian Theory and Technique.
Clinical application of Kleinian concepts to the psychoanalytic process will be discussed in relation to the works of Betty Joseph, Edna O’Shaughnessy, Hanna Segal, and other contemporary Kleinians.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E816: Narcissism.
The issue of narcissism is examined with a focus on theoretical considerations and clinical cases. Among the theorists studied will be Sigmund Freud, Heinz Kohut, Otto Kernberg, and Bela Grunberger.   The seminar is aimed at helping the student understand the concept of narcissism from several different theoretical perspectives and the various implications for technique.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E817: Advanced Seminar on Character Analysis and Treatment of the Character Disorders.
The seminar on character analysis focuses on character and character traits as viewed from various theoretical perspectives.  Course topics include: the development of character; fantasy, as it contributes to character; differential diagnosis and treatment implications. Also discussed are the implications of the analyst's character on treatment. The usefulness of the concept of character is highlighted in working with resistance, transference, and countertransference.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E820: Current Literature on Psychoanalytic Technique
Psychoanalysis aims at obtaining certain results. This seminar studies methods of technique and their possible results. That is, questions such as “How does this intervention or interaction produce that result?” will be explored. Current readings from professional journals are discussed.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E825: Seminar on Symbolization and Creativity
The seminar focuses on symbolization in primary and secondary process thinking as manifested in dreams, metaphors, fantasies, and creativity. 
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E827: Independent Study of Psychoanalysis
The candidate conducts an individual research project on a significant theoretical or clinical aspect of psychoanalysis, with the prior approval of the Dean of Faculty and Curriculum. A detailed outline with bibliography should be submitted to the Dean when requesting this course. The completed project will be evaluated by the candidate’s mentor. Credit for one course is given.  The usual tuition is charged.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E831: The Psychoanalytic Approach to Psychosomatic Pathology
Psychoanalysts have long known that early pathological object relations and psychic conflict contribute to the causation and maintenance of many physical symptoms and conditions for which medical treatments alone are often inadequate to effect improvement.  Topics include early object relations and their regulatory function, family pathology, somatization as metaphor, alexithymia and resistance. Conditions covered will include neurasthenia and chronic fatigue syndrome, anorexia, colitis, infertility, impotence, eczema, asthma, and others. Case material and treatment techniques will be discussed.
Prerequisite:  Matriculation.

E832: Inductions, Seductions:  Through a Dark Mirror
Participants explore the creative use of projective identifications, role inductions, and the technique of mirroring unconscious material. The class combines a participatory atmosphere and an emotional/cognitive integration of theory and technique.
Prerequisite:  Open to all candidates.

E833: Seminar on Depression
This course explores the clinical issues and theoretical perspectives involved in the psychoanalytic understanding and treatment of depression.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

E850: Fantasy and Unconscious Process
Clinical applications of unconscious fantasy and its role in the organization of patients' associations are reviewed. Among other topics, this seminar studies the way unconscious fantasy manifests itself in the session, the criteria for interpretation, the relation of unconscious fantasy to transference and countertransference, and the relation between unconscious fantasy and the patient’s actual life history. Readings from Arlow, Boesky, Grossman, and others.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E864C: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis: Introduction to Bion
Selected concepts from W. R. Bion's work will be explored as drawn from his writings on alpha function, beta elements, dream work, catastrophe, faith, knowledge, love hate, psychosis and the psychoanalytic attitude. The course covers Bion's use of literature, mysticism, mathematics, mythology, and philosophy as integral parts of his psychoanalytic approach. How his life experiences fed his psychoanalytic vision, opening new kinds of experiencing, will also be explored.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E864D: Contemporary Theories in Psychoanalysis:  Introduction to Lacan
The purpose of this course is to present a basic understanding of Lacan’s concepts from clinical and theoretical perspectives. The course will place Lacan in the history of the psychoanalytic movement and describe his relationship with the International Psychoanalytic Association. Some of his most basic formulations will be illustrated with clinical examples from Freud’s cases analyzed by Lacan and from the instructor’s and candidates’ own clinical cases.
Prerequisite: Readiness-for-Control.

E866: Lesbians in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice
The course is designed for analytic candidates who work with lesbians and who desire a deeper understanding of the clinical differences between lesbian and heterosexual women.  Theory, case studies, and the writings of lesbian and heterosexual analysts will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

E867: The Homosexual Male in Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice
The course is designed for analysts who are working with or who intend to work with homosexual males. Both theory and the clinical implications of working with homosexuality in men will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

E868: Seminar on Attachment Theory
This course will introduce candidates to some of the major ideas offered by attachment theorists.  Concepts such as attachment categories, secure base and reflective function will be studied with a view toward integrating this perspective into clinical psychoanalytic work.
Prerequisite: Matriculation.

E872: Writing Psychoanalysis
This course explores a range of issues concerning personal, theoretical, clinical, ethical, and practical aspects of writing and publishing psychoanalytic articles.  Discussions and readings address motivations, anxieties, and fantasies, as well as methodological considerations such as topic selection, research, organization and development of ideas, editing, literature review, journal submission and revision protocols.  Also examined are confidentiality, ethical risks and responsibilities, transference-countertransference implications and professional benefits.
Prerequisite:  Open to all candidates.

E873: Psychoanalysis and Family/Couple Relationships
This seminar, rooted in psychoanalytic inquiry, explores how psychoanalytic theory illuminates an appreciation of family (and couple) functioning.  By examining major psychoanalytic models (including ego, object relations, self psychology and attachment theory), the course sheds light on the “bridge” between psychoanalysis and significant “family-oriented” processes at individual, couple and child-in-family levels.  The class augments psychoanalytic interest in child development, couple functioning,  intergenerational transmission, and the role of the child vis-à-vis unconscious and conscious family projections and dynamics.  Pertinent literary contributions will complement analytic contributions.

E882: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Theory of Trauma & Dissociation
The dissociative model of the mind, interpersonal neurobiology, and attachment research offer congruent understandings and perspectives on the contemporary psychology of trauma.  Aron, Bromberg, Howell, Schore, Siegel, Van der Kolk, Wallin and others consider multiple self states, the implicit unconscious, and brain/mind/body aspects of PTSD.  Clinical implications will be discussed.
Prerequisite:  Readiness-for-Control


 

 
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